Is "Fat Acceptance" a Good Thing?

Ok people, topic of the day is body positivity/acceptance. I'll warn you now, if you think obese people should be happy with their obese bodies you probably wont like this post.

Body positivity is a great thing. There are people in the world who have things about themselves they don't like and can't change, and supporting these people is awesome. People shouldn't have to feel like they're ugly or don't belong due to a deformity or the fact they were burned badly. However, this applies to things people don't have control over and can't change. You don't see meth addicts hashtagging #bodypositivity because they're missing teeth and look like they belong in an exorcism movie, and if they did I doubt there would be blogs everywhere about how awesome it is.

Applying body positivity to the obese is complete bullshit, and I'd imagine insulting to those that actually have issues they can't change. Sure, there is a tiny minority of the overweight/obese who can't feasibly change it due to diseases etc, but the overwhelming majority can fix it. A burn victim can't regenerate their tissue, a fat person can put the fucking donuts down (I'm not implying that's easy, there are many factors that can make losing weight hard that I'll get to later).

But there's an even worse aspect to body positivity in this context. It just reinforces the fact that self worth should be connected to someone's body. Instead of helping people understand that being overweight or obese is a temporary physical state and shouldn't reflect on one's self worth, it attempts to boost their self worth by telling them their body is ok. Of course most of these people know that's a lie, and I highly doubt many fat people are positive about their bodies when they look at themselves naked in the mirror, no matter how many body positive hashtagged links they share from everydayfeminism.com. So now while they publicly proclaim how happy they are lifting their rolls to wash themselves in the shower, they still feel like shit about the state of their body, and it's connection to their self worth has just been strengthened.

 I was not happy when I was almost 300lbs.

I was not happy when I was almost 300lbs.

Now this doesn't mean the obese should hate their bodies either, but they shouldn't accept them how they are as if it's how they have to be. Accepting and celebrating something doesn't typically lead to changing said thing. Not too many people work their ass off to change something they love and accept. Losing weight can be incredibly difficult, if you are happy with your body the way it is losing weight to become healthier isn't likely going to happen. 

It's important to separate self worth from body image. Body fat levels aren't a reflection of worth as a person. There are awesome people with a lot of body fat and shitty people with very little. However if you really love yourself why would you settle for an unhealthy state of living? Why would you be content knowing you're shortening your life expectancy and quality of life? Why wouldn't you want to change your body to become healthier and better reflect how awesome you are? Self improvement is a good thing, regardless of what area it's in. Why wouldn't someone want to improve their health and physical features?

Oh, that's right, because it's hard. Fat acceptance is the easy way out for those that think they're going to fail. Our media's obsession with fad diets and miracle pills doesn't help, and many people have tried to lose weight many times and eventually given up because they think they can never do it. Each failure weighs harder and harder until it's too hard to even try. Then the fat acceptance concept sounds awesome. "I can be beautiful without changing anything? I can be healthy at any size because a blog said so? I don't need to conform to society's beauty standards and being 150lbs overweight isn't actually a bad thing?" It's an attractive concept to believe you can get all the benefits of drastic life changes with just an attitude change, but it's a fucking fairy tale.

Health at any size is bullshit, while the metabolically healthy obese don't show as high risks as the metabolically unhealthy obese, it is common to switch to metabolically unhealthy over time, and compared to metabolically healthy normal weight individuals risks are still higher and quality of life is still typically lower. I included lots of studies below for those that will argue that point.

That leads to the next term, body/fat acceptance. Why the fuck are we supposed to accept obesity? Do we accept cancer, or diabetes? Fuck no, we organize runs and get off our asses and do something about it. Obesity is a disease, and it's preventable and reversible. But instead of organizing anti-obesity runs (or maybe leisurely strolls to fit the demographic) we have decided we need to borderline glorify it by sharing articles about a 200lbs overweight "model" who is supposed to be inspirational and will likely die 20 years early due to her gluttony. Things like that are revolting and quite frankly counterproductive to the fucking human race.

I had started typing about fat shaming and wanted to address reasons it's hard to lose weight when obese, but this is already fairly long so I'll make this a series. Look out for the next post which will address those things. This one sounded harsh, but the next will talk about reasons why it is hard for the fat to lose weight, and I'll also talk about strategies to overcome in the future also.

And as always, if you'd like guidance getting healthier or just looking better, pm me :)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24297192/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28911506
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28919065
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28385392
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22507609
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924161/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25011950
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20573755/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28922565
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28781161
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28644850
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28636624
http://www.eje-online.org/content/171/6/R209.long
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670711/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26108064/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26857595/